Dry & Dried Fruit 2018-12-05T15:04:18+00:00

Dry & Dried Fruit

Almonds | Hazelnuts | Cashews | Pine Nuts | Pistachios | Nuts | Raisins | Goji Berries | Chestnut Flour

HISTORY

Dry and dried fruit is obtained from the fruits of various perennial plants belonging to different families. The fresh fruits can be dehydrated to increase their shelf life, while the seeds of the dried fruits stay inside their leathery shells that protect them.

Among the nuts, we can distinguish those typical of temperate climates, such as almonds and hazelnuts, and tropical ones, such as cashew nuts or the Amazon nut.

These foods have always been of great importance to humans because they are incredibly energetic, practical to transport and storable. Therefore, they have been an integral part of the man’s diet since the dawn of history and have spread throughout the world.

OUR FRUITS

Our fruits come exclusively from controlled supply chains: we collaborate with Italian companies specialised in the processing of nuts and import directly from third countries what not grown in Italy.

In the Bel Paese, almonds are typically from the southern regions, mostly Puglia and Sicily, hazelnuts instead come from Lazio, Piedmont and Campania which is also the primary producer of pine nuts. Finally, chestnuts grow mainly in Piedmont. The other fruits come from the respective countries of origin or the countries specialised in their cultivation.

For each product, we make sure that the raw material supply chains are gluten-free guaranteed.

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Dried fruit is rich in proteins and lipids, but also of nutraceutical substances such as vitamins and mineral salts, reasons why athletes and wellness lovers widely use it.

The presence of vitamin E, a molecule with a high antioxidant power that prevents ageing and fights free radicals, together with mineral salts, in particular, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper and zinc, makes dried fruit a particularly interesting food at the nutritional level.

Moreover, the lipid fraction is represented by unsaturated fatty acids omega-3, 6 and 9, which perform very beneficial actions for our body: in fact, in addition to preventing the accumulation of triglycerides in the blood thus protecting the cardiovascular system, defend the mucous membranes intestinal, have an anti-inflammatory action and increase the body’s immune response.

Shelled Almonds, Peeled & Toasted

Shelled Almonds, Peeled & Toasted

ORIGIN: Italy

Fruit of the Prunus Dulcis plant belonging to the Rosaceae family, the Almond is an oily seed widespread, since ancient times, in all the countries bordering the Mediterranean.

Excellent sources of protein and unsaturated fats, almonds are a food rich in antioxidants that counteract free radicals and contribute to the well-being of the body. Besides, these seeds guarantee a good supply of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium, which help to strengthen the bones and support the nervous system in situations of stress or fatigue.

Finally, almonds have a high fibre content, which helps to balance the metabolism.
Protagonists of many gastronomic preparations typical of Southern Italy, such as pasta and almond milk and marzipan, almonds can be used in the kitchen with great versatility in sweet and savoury recipes or just as a snack to be consumed raw or toasted.

Shelled Hazelnuts, Peeled & Toasted

Shelled Hazelnuts, Peeled & Toasted

ORIGIN: Italy

Hazelnut is the fruit of Corylus Avellana: this botanical name was attributed to him by the Romans who used the Greek word còrys, which means ‘headgear’ since the shell protects the seed looks a little like a hat. Plant cultivated by man since ancient times, at the time of the Roman empire, they used to donate hazelnut trees to wish happiness.

Thanks to the varied content of precious mineral salts for our body, hazelnuts are a real natural supplement. Rich in unsaturated fats, considered particularly beneficial for the heart, hazelnuts also have a high content of B vitamins and surprising levels of vitamin E.

Characterised by a sweet and buttery taste that blends perfectly with that of cocoa, in the kitchen hazelnuts are often used mainly for pastry products and sweets such as nougat, confetti, chocolates, praline hazelnuts, ice cream, cookies, cakes, muësli and chocolate spread. Despite the predominance of sweet uses, these fruits lend themselves well to savoury preparations; they can be a valid alternative to pine nuts in pesto or to garnish bread instead of walnuts. Finally, they are an excellent healthy snack to eat at breakfast or as hunger-cruncher.

Cashews

Cashews

ORIGIN: Non-EU

The cashew is an oily seed extracted from the Western Anacardium, a tropical fruit tree native to Brazil. The spread of this seed in the world is attributable to the Portuguese navigators, who introduced it in India in the 16th century, where the culture soon became fundamental for its inhabitants.

Cashew nuts contain many beneficial substances for our body. These fruits are a good source of B vitamins, essential amino acids and minerals. These seeds also have a high content of antioxidant substances such as zeaxanthin, which is necessary for its preventive action for ocular degeneration due to ageing.

In the kitchen, cashews can be eaten naturally as snacks but also smoothies to make cashew butter – a light alternative to the more classic peanut butter – to be easily prepared at home with just a few ingredients. They also represent excellent substitutes or addition to pine nuts in the preparation of pesto and a tasty element to enrich salads, main courses of meat, soups and velvety or the muësli for breakfast.

Pine Nuts

Pine Nuts

ORIGIN: Italy

Small and precious, pine nuts take three years to mature and to obtain just one kilo, at least thirty kilos of pine cones are needed. Consumed by man since ancient times, pine nuts have always had the reputation of being extraordinary aphrodisiacs.

Their nutritional particularity, compared to other dried fruits, is in the presence of Pinolenic acid, which helps to encourage some hormones able to limit the stimulus of hunger.

In the Mediterranean diet, pine nuts are mainly used to enrich sauces, salads and desserts. Furthermore, characterised by a very delicate flavour and a pleasantly resinous aroma, pine nuts – often roasted to enhance the taste – are included in many traditional recipes such as pesto alla Genovese, castagnaccio or strudel.

Pistachios

Pistachios

ORIGIN: EU / non-EU

Derived from the Pistacia vera, a tree that can reach a height of about 12 meters and 300 years of age, pistachios are small bright green fruits covered by a light shell, originating in the Middle East, where have been cultivated since prehistoric times.

Particularly appreciated for the originality of taste and their adaptability, In the kitchen, pistachios are often an ingredient of confectionery for sweets such as cakes, nougats, mousses, confetti, ice creams and granitas.

Toasted and salted Pistachios are the quintessential snack during an aperitif.

Walnuts

Walnuts, Halves & Quarters

ORIGIN: UE / non-UE

Commonly defined as nut, this fruit comes from the tree Juglans regia, which owes its name to the Latin phrase “Jovis glans”, that is “acorn of Jupiter”, so defined for the goodness and the high nutritional value of the fruit.

Rich in vitamin E, folic acid and mineral salts, walnuts also contain ellagic acid, an anti-oxidant beneficial for the immune system. Furthermore, they present a moderate dose of melatonin, a substance produced by the pineal gland that helps regulate the rhythm of sleep and wakefulness. Finally, they contain arginine, an amino acid that coordinates the right amount of blood to the muscles.

The taste of walnuts, sweet at first and bitter in the aftertaste, lends itself to all culinary preparations. From main courses, through salads and sauces to sweets and liqueurs, walnuts are indeed used in every way. Some of the most famous Italian recipes are the walnut sauce, tagliatelle with walnuts and pumpkin, walnut bread, cakes and biscuits.

Raisin

Raisin

ORIGIN: non-UE

Vitis Vinifera Sativa – better known as raisins – is a variety whose provenance got lost in the mists of time. Almost certainly originating from South-Western Asia and then subsequently introduced in the Mediterranean basin, today it is known and appreciated in the dried version obtained by subjecting fresh grapes to a natural dehydration process.

The benefits of integrating raisin in the daily diet are many; one of the most important and least known is the high concentration of phenol substances that have an intense anti-oxidant action and positively stimulate the glucose metabolism. Also excellent, as a quick source of sugars, raisin also boasts laxative properties thanks to the abundance of fibres.

Sweet flavour and easy to chew thanks to its thin skin, the sultanas are much loved by children, people who like sweets and those who prefer sweet and sour dishes. Often found in great classics such as strudel, castagnaccio, panettone and many other pastry delicacies, raisins are also widely used in creams, jams and liqueurs as in the case of table wines or grappa. Furthermore, this fruit also finds a place in savoury preparations, especially in the Neapolitan and Sicilian cuisine, where often associated with cod or pine nuts. Finally, it can be consumed, alone or in combination, with other dry and dried fruit, as a tasty and healthy snack.

Goji Berries

Goji Berries

ORIGIN: non-UE

Appreciated for their properties and known in the East for thousands of years, Goji berries are small, slightly elongated, deep red fruits, harvested from a shrub belonging to the Solanaceae family that grows wild in the valleys of the Himalayas, Tibet, Mongolia and in the provinces of Xinjiang and Ningxia in China. The word Goji probably comes from the approximation of the Chinese pronunciation gǒuqǐ 枸杞, which is the Chinese term for berry.

An essential element in traditional Chinese medicine, Goji berries are rich in proteins, mineral salts such as sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium, potassium and manganese, vitamins A, C, E and B1, carotene, lutein, amino acids and fibres. All these nutrients guarantee enormous benefits for health and its maintenance. Goji berries help to detoxify the liver, to maintain hydration and elasticity of the skin, to strengthen the immune system.

Despite their highly beneficial properties, it is recommended not to exaggerate with the dosage. In particular, the recommended daily dosage for adults is 30 grams (plus or minus three tablespoons), while for children it is limited to 3 teaspoons.

As for their use in the kitchen, they can be incorporated into the doughs of bakery products to add a special touch to doughnuts, biscuits, cereal bars. They are excellent in the morning in yoghurt together with the muësli, or they can be combined in salads and couscous, or directly eaten as snacks, alone or together with seeds and dried fruit.

Chestnut Flour

Chestnut Flour

ORIGIN: Italy

Chestnuts are the fruits of Castanea Sativa, a plant belonging to the Fagaceae family that grows in mainly mountainous regions, from 450 to 900 meters. Known in the past as the “bread of the poor”; chestnut is, in fact, rich in complex carbohydrates, represents an excellent alternative to cereals and a significant source of livelihood for many peoples, especially for the inhabitants of mountain regions characterised by particularly hostile climates.

Obtained by a careful process of selection, harvesting, drying and grinding of fruits, chestnut flour represents an important nutritional food thanks to the high percentage of carbohydrates and starches and the moderate content in proteins and fats. Chestnut flour is also a source of mineral salts, including magnesium, sulfur, potassium, iron and calcium and offers good content of vitamins B1, B2, C and PP.

Although to date, only marginally used, this flour is an ingredient still widespread especially in Tuscany and Emilia Romagna where it is possible to taste pancakes or panzarotti of chestnut flour. More often known as sweet flour, this variety is also an essential ingredient for the preparation of numerous gastronomic specialities, such as castagnaccio, sweets and polenta. Finally, as it is gluten-free, chestnut flour is an excellent alternative for people with celiac disease.