Cereals 2018-12-05T16:47:18+00:00

CEREALS

Oat | Barley | Spelt | Rye | Wheat | Millet | Sorghum | Buckwheat | Quinoa | Mais | Amaranth | Teff | Rice

HISTORY

Cereals are annual herbaceous plants belonging to the Gramineae family, whose seeds are rich in starch.

In addition to representing the basis of human nutrition, the domestication of these plants indicated the transition from prehistory to history when the nomadic hunter turned into a sedentary farmer.

Nowadays, even gluten-free plants’ seeds belonging to different families such as Quinoa (Chenopodiaceae), Buckwheat (Polygonaceae), and Amaranth (Amaranthaceae), are commonly considered as cereals because of their high starch content.

Cereals are a staple food widespread all over the world and their cultivation origins are to be found in different regions of the planet as well. In fact, the autumn-winter cereals came from the fertile crescent, from where they spread to all the temperate regions, up to the Arctic polar circle. Rice and buckwheat appeared more on the east, on the Himalayas’ slopes while sorghum, millet and teff are native to Africa, and corn, quinoa and amaranth spontaneously grow in the Andean regions of South and Central America.

OUR CEREALS

Our cereals come from controlled supply chains only: in fact, we collaborate with Italian companies specialized in different products processing, and we import directly from third countries what is not grown in Italy.

Our supply chain projects include millet, sorghum, rye and soft wheat, which are grown by farmers in central Italy only with whom we have been maintaining a direct collaboration. The autumn-winter cereals, such as wheat, rye, barley, spelt and oats are grown in the dry soils of central-southern regions, while the spring ones, such as sorghum and corn, are grown on irrigated lands only. Rice, on the other hand, needs a special soil – located in the northern regions – that allows the culture to be submerged. Finally, buckwheat is grown exclusively in the pre-alpine and Apennine valleys. Ultimately, the majority of our cereals are grown in different Italian regions except for teff, quinoa, amaranth and some varieties of rice, which are imported from their countries of origin.

The sorting, peeling and milling of naturally gluten-free cereals take place in facilities where only gluten-free products are processed. The cereal flours, instead, are obtained through seeds’ natural stone milling in which, thanks to the low temperatures maintained during the process, products’ nutritional and organoleptic qualities remain invariant in the flour. In particular, gluten-free flours’ stone milling takes place in our facilities in Spoleto.

NUTRITIONAL CHARACTERISTICS

Cereals are low in sugar, rich in starch and have a high fibre content. This particular composition gives cereals a low glycemic index and a high satiety one, ideal in low-calorie diets, as well as the ability to regulate digestive and assimilated processes: fibre, in fact, reduces the absorption of sugars and fats and promotes the regular activity of the intestine.

The nutritional properties of cereals are to be found in the presence of antioxidants, such as selenium, B vitamins, C, E, K and important minerals such as zinc, calcium, silicon, iron, manganese, copper, calcium, potassium and magnesium. The fat content is limited and the lipid fraction is represented by unsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) which, together with phytosterols, prevent the accumulation of triglycerides in the blood resulting particularly beneficial for the cardiovascular system.

The proteins, present in good quantity, are of good biological value thanks to the presence of many essential amino acids, in particular, phenylalanine, methionine, threonine, valine, leucine and isoleucine. Gluten is the protein that characterizes autumn-winter cereals such as wheat, barley, spelt, rye and oats and is responsible for the rheological characteristics of traditional dough used for the production of pasta and bakery products. Since gluten is an allergen, naturally gluten-free cereals are gaining market approval and are widely used as ingredients for products that were previously prepared only with wheat flour; in fact, gluten-free products are more digestible than traditional ones, even for those who are not intolerant.

Gluten Free Millet Flour

Gluten Free Millet Flour

ORIGIN: Italy Supply Chain

Characterized by a hint of slightly vegetal and a delicate sweet aroma, millet flour is gluten-free and rich in vitamins.

Perfect to give consistency to otherwise delicate compounds, such as meatballs and meatloaf, millet flour is also ideal for crepes, unleavened bread doughs, wraps and crackers. It is also excellent, used in batter for frying, added to sauces and soups or to prepare a kind of soft polenta.

Gluten-Free Wholegrain Buckwheat Flour

Gluten-Free Wholegrain Buckwheat Flour

ORIGIN: Italy

Buckwheat flour is a naturally gluten-free product obtained by stone milling the whole grain characterized by a rustic aroma and a strong taste given by the numerous flavonoids it contains. This flour also presents a high biological value by being rich in essential amino acids.

It can be a great option, used in combination with other flours, for the preparation of traditional dishes such as pizzoccheri, polenta taragna, soba (buckwheat spaghetti) and many baked goods such as biscuits, snacks, crackers or focaccia. Buckwheat flour can be added to the bread dough to confer a rustic aroma to it and also combined with rice flour in the preparation of crepes or blinis.

Amaranth

Amaranth

ORIGIN: not EU

Amaranth is an annual herbaceous plant belonging to the Amaranthaceae botanical family, and the first discovery of its seeds dates back to the Incas and Aztecs who referred to this pseudo-cereal as “Grain of the Gods”. Completely gluten-free, Amaranth is particularly suitable for those affected by the celiac disease; moreover, thanks to the quantity of high-quality organic proteins, Amaranth is a great ingredient to be integrated into any vegetarian or vegan diet. In the kitchen, Amaranth is best suitable for preparing soups, croquettes, sweet or savoury puddings and energy bars.

Gluten-Free Amaranth Flour

Gluten-Free Amaranth Flour

ORIGIN: non-UE

Characterized by sharp aromas, with hints of toasted nuts, amaranth flour is an excellent ingredient for those who follow a gluten-free diet. In the kitchen, it is ideal to thicken sauces or compact stuffing and for preparing shortcrust pastry, biscuits or soft pastries that do not require strong structures, such as sponge cake. In mixtures for bread or pasta, on the other hand, it can be used at 25-30% because in larger quantities it hardens the doughs. Amaranth flour is also excellent in combination with rice flour -especially the wholegrain one, if you want to increase the rustic taste-, quinoa flour, tapioca starch and potato starch, which add compactness and structure, and it is ideal in a dough with a well-defined aroma, such as those with spices, chocolate and nuts.

Teff

Teff

ORIGIN: EU

Teff is a cereal native to Ethiopia, where it was cultivated for human consumption as early as 4000 BC. According to popular etymology, the term tef means “lost”, to indicate the extreme facility that the super small seed slides between one’s fingers and get, indeed, lost. Teff is a gluten-free cereal that provides a good supply of proteins of high biological value, complex carbohydrates, minerals and vitamins. In the kitchen, Teff is considered an excellent thickener for soups and stews and is delicious in combination with legumes, especially beans and chickpeas or with Tofu.

Gluten-Free Teff Flour

Gluten-Free Teff Flour

ORIGIN: EU

Obtained by stone milling the wholegrain seeds, in the kitchen, Teff flour is a valid gluten-free alternative to other cereal flours. The essential ingredient to prepare the traditional Ethiopian injera – bread, teff flour is also perfect for cooking shortcrust pastry, biscuits, pancakes and bread. It is also an excellent solution to thicken soups, sauces and creams. Teff flour can replace up to 25% of the basic flour in those recipes that require structure, while it can be used even in higher percentages for soft desserts or crepes since, during the cooking, tends to become slightly gelatinous.

Corn

Corn

ORIGIN: Italy

Corn is one of the most cultivated agricultural species in the world thanks to its high productivity and rapid growth that make it extremely interesting for farmers. Unfortunately, towards the end of the 20th century, intensive cultivation and the growing interest concerning this cereal led to the manipulation of the genome of this plant to obtain agronomic advantages such as resistance to herbicides or insects. At B.M.S. we believe in nature, there is the reason for which we carefully select and analyze our seeds to guarantee a 100% GMO-free product. The variety of corn we offer is also suitable for popcorn preparation.

Gluten Free Corn Flours: Fioretto, Bramata & Instantanea

Gluten Free Corn Flours: Fioretto, Bramata & Instantanea

ORIGIN: Italy

There are different varieties of corn flour, depending on milling’s fineness. Fioretto flour is fine-grained and is particularly suitable for preparation of soft polenta, cakes, sweets, bread or biscuits such as the typical Piedmontese “paste di meliga”. Bramata flour, instead, is obtained from coarse-grained corn and is mainly used for polenta, a typical speciality of Italian north-eastern regions. To make the Instantanea (precooked) we steam the corn kernels before grounding them to pre-gel the starch and make the cooking extremely fast.

White Quinoa & Quinoa Real

White Quinoa & Quinoa Real

ORIGIN: not EU

Called by the Incas “chisiya mama” – which in the Quechua language means “mother of all seeds” – Quinoa is one of the best foods to integrate into a vegetarian or vegan diet, and for those allergic or intolerant to gluten.
Besides representing a complete source of high biological value proteins with an exceptionally well-balanced profile of essential amino acids, Quinoa is entirely gluten-free.
The most common variety of quinoa is the white one, characterised by an almost neutral taste and a light and soft texture. The Real, is a distinct variety of white quinoa grown in Bolivia that presents an unusually large seed. Quinoa cooks quickly and, thanks to its delicate taste, is a polyvalent ingredient: it is suitable for replacing pasta in minestrone, for stuffing savoury pies and with vegetables sautéed. B.M.S. is very proud of offering a selection of white quinoa entirely grown in Italy.

Red Quinoa

Red Quinoa

ORIGIN: not EU

Compared to white quinoa, the red variety has a richer and nuttier flavour and a crispier texture that makes it perfect for salads. Besides, red quinoa can maintain an excellent consistency in cooking, making it ideal as an alternative to rice in more elaborate risotto recipes. It is also excellent in combination with legumes and vegetables, especially mushrooms and pumpkin, or with white meats, fish and shrimp.

Black Quinoa

Black Quinoa

ORIGIN: not EU

Unusually small and crunchy grains presenting a characteristic scent are the main features of quinoa’s wildest variety, the black one. Compared to the white type, it has a more aromatic flavour. Black quinoa is suitable for many different preparations, both sweet and savoury, such as meatballs, salads, soups, and can also be integrated in bread and baked products to add a touch of colour.

Hulled Oat

Hulled Oat

ORIGIN: Italia

Oats grains or peeled oats can be used in combination with seasonal vegetables and legumes, for winter soups, cold salads and vegetable balls preparation. Oats main feature is the presence of “avenin”, an alkaloid that has tonic, energetic and balancing effects on the nervous system and stimulates the function of the thyroid.

Oatflakes

Oatflakes

ORIGIN: UE

The production of oatsflakes consist of different steps: first, the whole grains are steamed to soften, then rolled through roller flats to flatten them, and finally pushed through a stream of air to dry the oats. Generally used for breakfast, oatflakes are often the main ingredient of muesli or can be cooked to make porridge. Finally, whole or ground oat flakes are an excellent ingredient for the preparation of croquettes and vegetable burger, and also for the breading.

Oat Bran

Oat Bran

ORIGIN: UE

During the milling process, the raw flour is sifted to separate the coarser fraction, called bran, resulting from crushing of the outermost layer of the caryopsis. For this reason, the bran is extremely rich in fibres and minerals. Thanks to its satiating properties, oat bran is particularly suitable for slimming diets. In the kitchen, it is excellent in combination with low-fat yoghurt, in milk or used for the dough of bread, pizza, mashed potatoes and crêpes.

Oat Flour

Oat Flour

ORIGIN: UE

Obtained by the stone grinding of the grains; oat flour therefore, maintains all the nutritional and beneficial properties of the cereal. More suitable for dry processing such as biscuits, oat flour is often mixed with wheat flour for a correct leavening in the formulation of baked products.

Hulled Barley

Hulled Barley

ORIGIN: Italia

Barley in nature is subjected to mechanical refining processes to remove the outermost part of the seed. This procedure makes the grain usable in the kitchen while maintaining most of the original nutritional characteristics. Hulled barley presents a high fibre content, in particular, a high level of beta-glucans, whose action helps to reduce cholesterol and blood sugar. In the kitchen, it is excellent for soups, paired with seasonal vegetables or to enrich cream and velvety creams.

Pearled Barley

Pearled Barley

ORIGIN: Italia

Pearled barley is subjected to further processing compared to the hulled version to completely remove the bean tegument, which makes it more digestible and ready to cook.

During cooking, barley swells a lot, a reason for which it provides a satiating feeling and, at the same, time brings low-calorie content. Pearled barley can also be cooked like risotto and is particularly suitable for preparing soups, stew and salads.

Rye

Rye

ORIGIN: Italy Supply Chain

Rye presents strong adaptability to cold climates and is mainly cultivated in temperate zones like central and northern Europe.

Although flour is one of the most common uses of this cereal, whole grains are suitable for preparing soups, vegetable stews, cold and warm salads. Rye also helps in protecting the blood vessels, thanks to the presence of lysine. In addition to this, rye has purifying and detoxifying properties that make it an excellent ally of kidneys and liver.

Hulled Farro Monococco [Einkorn wheat]

Hulled Farro Monococco [Einkorn wheat]

(only on request)

ORIGIN: Italy

The first species of Triticum cultivated by man was the T. Monococcum variety that presented low fertility as each spikelet produced only one grain. On the other hand, the Farro Monococcus is very appreciated for its high digestibility due to the low content of gluten and starch. In addition, unsaturated fatty acids, tocols and carotenoids make it a strong antioxidant.

Pearled Farro Dicocco

Pearled Farro Dicocco

ORIGIN: Italy

In order to make Farro more digestible and faster to cook, we further process the hulled product by removing the outermost part of the grains.The pearled version tends to remain a bit softer after cooking, making it a very versatile match for vegetables, fish or meat. It can also be used as an alternative to rice in timbales, supplì, cold salads or simply seasoned with a drizzle of olive oil and some spice of your choice.

Wholegrain & White Farro Dicocco [Emmer] & Monococco [Einkorn Wheat] Flour

Wholegrain & White Farro Dicocco [Emmer] & Monococco [Einkorn Wheat] Flour

ORIGIN: Italy

The first species of Triticum cultivated by man was the T. Monococcum variety that presented low fertility as each spikelet produced only one grain. Following the selection made by men, the T. Dicoccum was created, whose spike produced two grains. Thanks to the increased productivity, this species has dominated the agricultural landscape in the Mediterranean region for centuries, until it has been replaced by modern wheat, T. Durum and T. Aestivum, durum wheat and soft respectively. In relation to the intrinsic characteristics of the seeds and the different types of milling, Farro Dicocco flour is more suitable for producing pasta, while the Farro Monococco variety is a better option for bakery products.

Hulled Farro Dicocco [Emmer]

Hulled Farro Dicocco [Emmer]

ORIGIN: Italy

Farro Dicocco is a “dressed cereal” since during the harvesting the glume that surrounds its caryopsis is not removed, the reason for which, the seeds require one more process of de-hulling before using it for cooking. Thanks to its excellent nutritional properties and versatility, Hulled Farro is widely used in the Mediterranean, vegetarian and vegan cuisine. Its delicate taste makes it a great ingredient for soups, minestrone or veggie meatballs’ stuffing.

Bulgur

Bulgur

ORIGIN: Italy, not UE

Produced by processing durum wheat, Bulgur is an ancient food originating from Anatolia that was used by the Babylonians and is still very present in Middle Eastern cuisine. Since Bulgur is simply ground durum wheat, the nutritional characteristics of this food are the same as the cereal: low in calories and fat while rich in complex carbohydrates, proteins, fibre and mineral salts. In the kitchen, as well as for the preparation of the classic tabbouleh, it lends itself well both for soups in broth and soups, but also for cold dishes or as an accompaniment and salads.

Soft Wheat

Soft Wheat

ORIGIN: Italy Supply Chain

Cereal a little forgotten in the kitchen in recent years, if not in the form of flour, bread and cakes, the soft wheat was, in the past, very used, especially in rural culture and those who lived in the countryside considered a corroborant food, nutritious and cheap. Recently rediscovered, wheat is a very versatile ingredient that lends itself to various culinary preparations such as cold salads, timbales, stuffed vegetables, croquettes and soups.

Soft Wheat Bran

Soft Wheat Bran

ORIGIN: EU

Considered for a long time just as the waste part of the flour, the bran has recently been re-evaluated since, at a nutritional level, it is very rich in mineral salts and fibres.
Its ability to prevent some of the most common disturbances in contemporary western society is well known, for example, hyperglycemia, constipation, obesity and other diseases. In the kitchen, it is perfect in combination with low-fat yoghurt, milk or to be added in the preparation of mashed potatoes, crêpes, and bread and pizza dough.

Soft Wheat Germ

Soft Wheat Germ [only on request]

ORIGIN: EU

The germ is the embryo and the vital part of the wheat seed that, during the milling, is separated from the flour to prevent rancidity, in fact, the germ is rich in lipids, mainly unsaturated, but also vitamins. Its nutritional characteristics, therefore, make it a natural food supplement, which can be used raw to garnish any preparation.

Soft and Durum Wheat Flours

Soft and Durum Wheat Flours
(only on request)

ORIGIN: Italy

“Wheat is not our speciality” loves repeating our agronomist every time he meets a new farmer. However, to complete the range of products offered to our customers, we can provide all types of soft and durum wheat, strictly stone-grounded by our most reliable partners.

White Rice
Carnaroli, Round, Ribe & Aromatic Long Rice

White Rice
Carnaroli, Round, Ribe & Aromatic Long Rice

ORIGIN: Italy

Rice’s botanical peculiarity is to be found in its root, able to produce a tissue that allows this cereal to live in an aquatic environment. Since this characteristic strongly influences the cultivation methods, rice is grown on fields completely covered in water. Characterized by high digestibility, no gluten and, almost endless uses in the kitchen, rice is the food base of over half of the human population.

Brown Rice
Ribe [also semi-wholegrain], Round & Thaibonnet Rice

Brown Rice Ribe (also semi-wholegrain), Round & Thaibonnet Rice

ORIGIN: Italy

Brown rice is one of natural cooking’s main ingredients; hulled grain contains bran and germ that are full of unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, mineral salts and fibre.

Brown rice also presents great culinary versatility, excellent with meat and cheese, it also goes well with vegetables and legumes, making it perfect for side dishes, soups and salads.

Basmati Rice

Basmati Rice

ORIGIN: not EU

Basmati is a variety of long grain rice whose name in Indian means “queen of aromas” to indicate its delicate flavour, spicy aroma and natural scent with hints of sandalwood. Grown in India and Pakistan for hundreds of years and imported directly from these origins, Basmati rice is available both wholegrain and processed (only on request).

Black Rice

Black Rice

ORIGIN: Italy

This wholegrain variety presents a rare black colour and a pleasantly aromatic flavour. An ancient legend tells that this rice was grown in China exclusively for the emperor and his court and that it was particularly appreciated for its nutritional and aphrodisiac properties – hence the legendary name, “Forbidden Rice”.

In the kitchen, black rice is a perfect match for meat dishes, although the best combination would be with fish and shellfish dishes. Available both Venere and Nerone varieties.

Red Rice

Red Rice

ORIGIN: Italy, not EU

Often referred to as to “wild” because it grows spontaneously on lands characterized by clayey soil, this colourful and versatile rice variety presents an aromatic and delicate bouquet.

Perfect with fresh or cooked vegetables and light condiments, it is a great ingredient to add to velvety or cereal soups, hot pies, rice salads and even desserts.

Fine Gluten-Free Rice Flour

Fine Gluten-Free Rice Flour

ORIGIN: Italy

In Western culture, rice flour has a very limited gastronomic use even though, thanks to the absence of gluten, its use in the composition of gluten-free foods has been increasingly growing. Contrarily, in Eastern culture, rice flour has always represented one of the main ingredients of the local diet, often used to prepare traditional recipes such as mochi sweets and Japanese rice noodles.

Brown rice flour is tastier, has a richer aroma and is ideal for rustic dishes, such as pies with vegetables or homemade pasta.

Gluten-Free Hulled Millet

Gluten-Free Hulled Millet

ORIGIN: Italy Supply Chain

In Italy, millet has been widely consumed, especially in the northern regions, where, before the introduction of corn, they use it in the original recipe of polenta. Thanks to its very delicate taste, millet is suitable for a multitude of preparations in the kitchen, with both sweet and savoury flavours. It is a delicious option for veggie meatballs, croquettes, pies, stews or soups, and it is excellent in salads combined with vegetables, cheese and dried fruit.

Gluten-Free Hulled Sorghum

Gluten-Free Hulled Sorghum

ORIGIN: ItalySupply Chain

Grains of hulled sorghum is a good source of fibre, proteins and carbohydrates. Highly digestible and easily assimilable, sorghum is also rich in mineral salts, B vitamins and natural antioxidants. Sorghum is naturally gluten-free, the reason for which it is particularly suitable for celiac diets. In the kitchen, is a great ingredient to add to soups, stews, salads, vegetable balls and is also an alternative to couscous in the preparation of exotic dishes.

Gluten-Free Sorghum Flour

Gluten-Free Sorghum Flour

ORIGIN: Italy Supply Chain 

Sorghum flour is perfect for cakes dough, donuts and biscuits, as well as to thicken sauces and gravies due to its almost neutral aroma, sometimes sweetish flavour. Finally, thanks to its particular consistency, it lends itself not only to be mixed with starch in the assembled compounds but also to be used in purity, especially in shortcrust or in very hydrated doughs such as those of crepes, pancakes or waffles.

Hulled Buckwheat

Hulled Buckwheat

ORIGIN: EU, not EU

Buckwheat is an annual herbaceous plant of Asian origin belonging to the Polygonaceae family. Then, the “Saracens” exported it to the Middle East, and it is only around the sixteenth century that the plant arrived in Italy. A very balanced food with high satiety index, Buckwheat stands out from the common cereals for the high biological value of its proteins. Being gluten-free, Buckwheat is easily digestible and also suitable for those affected by intolerances or celiac disease. This cereal also presents a very low glycemic index and a high level of bioavailability; this latter allows using all the nutrients that buckwheat contains. In the kitchen, Buckwheat is a valid alternative to rice in cold salads or combined with vegetables and an excellent ingredient to add to winter soups.

Gluten Free Quinoa Flour

Gluten Free Quinoa Flour

ORIGIN: not EU

Quinoa flour, being gluten-free, is often used for the preparation of gluten-free dough, in purity or mixed with other flours such as buckwheat or millet. For sourdough bread, it is however convenient mixed with wheat flour. Quinoa flour also lends itself to the processing of dry pastries, such as biscuits; there are also various “farinata” recipes and some preparations destined to baby food.